the trans agenda

Percy. Eighteen. Transmasculine genderqueer (he/him/his pronouns). Panromantic demisexual. I post Orphan Black and feminism. You should send me an ask or something.

Oct 1

tedx:

Watch the whole talk here»

This guy stopped watching porn — and he wants you to know why. Gender activist Ran Gavrieli felt that most of the images he saw in porn encouraged negative, even violent, attitudes toward women, despite a recent wave of feminist porn. So he pulled the plug, and found that his personal sex life and private fantasies became much more fulfilling.

In his talk at TEDxJaffa, he advocates for physically and emotionally-safe sex, as well as erotica that shows a wider range of fulfilling sexual experiences — including the intimacy of human connection, laughter, and touch. Watch his talk here.

(via masslany)



Sep 30



(via piperchapman)


Sep 29

ludicrouscupcake:

poppy-the-knight:

sourcedumal:

I Love My Boo campaign features real young men of color loving each other passionately. Rather than sexualizing gay relationships, this campaign models caring, and highlights the importance of us taking care of each other. Featured throughout New York City, I Love My Boo directly challenges homophobia and encourages all who come across it to critically rethink our notion of love.

GMHC is the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Building on decades of dedication and expertise, we understand the reality of HIV/AIDS and empower a healthy life for all. GMHC fights to end the AIDS epidemic and uplift the lives of all affected.

this is fucking adorable

SPREAD THESE IMAGES LIKE WILDFIRE PRECISELY BECAUSE THEY FUCK UP THE MISGUIDED STEREOTYPES WE ALL ARE USED TO SEEING.

(via frumpybutsupersmart)


actionables:

I did a thing.

(via frumpybutsupersmart)


favorite character meme ♥ two of six traits ((manipulative)) 

(via ancientwoolunraveler)


holidaywithnuts:

Why is it always ‘queer people are projecting their identities onto characters’ and never ‘straight people are presuming that their identity is the default’?

(via thestanakatic)


becolddog:

ah ths is a nb femme day hagrid drawing for c!!!!!who is the best and im very glad was born. ILU C I HOPE WE CAN HANG OUT SOON DESPITE HOLIDAY STUFFS…….HAPPY BIRTHDAY..!!

becolddog:

ah ths is a nb femme day hagrid drawing for c!!!!!who is the best and im very glad was born. ILU C I HOPE WE CAN HANG OUT SOON DESPITE HOLIDAY STUFFS…….HAPPY BIRTHDAY..!!

(via leafycat)


queerchesters:

Listen, I don’t have a problem with heterosexuals, I work with one, I’m just not sure if I’m comfortable with seeing them on t.v. where impressionable young children can see them.

(via leafycat)


thewomanfromitaly:

lareinaana:

arienreign:

Why isn’t anyone talking about this?
http://www.dailydot.com/news/darrien-hunt-shot-by-police-while-cosplaying/

Watch non black cosplayers and lovers of cosplay stay silent on this.

(via gentlenight)


interactyouth:

Did you catch tonight’s episode of Faking It?! Cat’s out of the bag! Lauren’s intersex! We’ll be talking to different Inter/Act members, a group of young 14-25 year old intersex people, asking them to relate their intersex stories with Lauren’s story each week.
Lauren’s ex-boyfriend lets it slip, and she has to tell everyone she’s intersex. How did it feel watching that happen?
Milly: It was really hard to watch, but also so incredible. The music, the timing, everything was done so well. I was watching it for the first time with the cast as they saw it for the first time. I couldn’t look over at them because I knew they were looking at me and I didn’t want them to see the tears in my eyes. It felt so real, like I was there instead of Lauren and it was all of my friends turning on me. It was something I’ve had nightmares about since I was little, so watching it play out on screen like that was really scary, but also empowering. I’ve never seen someone on TV going through this before, and it made it feel okay. Like if Lauren can handle it then certainly I can.
Alice: Sitting there watching the episode, I was laughing along just like I had when I binged on it at home recently. But when the scene where Lauren’s secret is revealed came on I stopped laughing and tensed up. After she said “I’m Intersex” I immediately felt like I was her, in that room and the characters around her were all looking at me with wide eyes. I became hyper-conscious of how quiet the room was and my breathing went from autopilot to manual. I felt like if I moved an inch, the eyes in the room would all turn and look at me so instead I just froze. Not blinking, I took in the characters reactions and waited for what was next. I could hear the nervousness in my laugh when they asked Lauren what Intersex meant. When she reacted my adrenaline kicked in and I could feel that fight or flight feeling as she ran from the room. When the scene ended I realized I had just been taken back to my 15 year old self.. scared, ashamed, as if “my secret” had been exposed to my peers without my consent. It’s really not every day that you see a character like me on TV, especially not like this. After a moment I felt happy, proud, excited, and just in awe of how meaningful this was to me. I’m so excited for people to meet and learn to understand a character who is Intersex. I’m really looking forward to the rest of the season and how it will all play out!
How did people find out about you? Did anyone find out accidentally like this?
Lenny: I’ve been really careful about telling people, asking each of them to keep it confidential. Like all secrets, it doesn’t always work out that way, but I’ve been lucky and never really had anyone “out” me to others before I was ready. At some point, I learned that you just have trust people.
Milly: I told my friend once, and a few years later we were hanging out with her new boyfriend. He made  a joke about punching me in the ovaries because apparently teenage boys think that’s a funny thing to say to a girl. My friend got all affronted and says “Don’t say that! I told you she doesn’t have ovaries, remember??” I felt so shocked and violated, I didn’t feel like I could trust her with anything after that.
Maya: I tried to make sure I was always in control when allowing people to find out about my CAIS. This was because I wanted to make sure they got the facts and not unreliable information. However my sister told some of our mutual friends without asking me and I found out later on that they knew, which was an incredibly tough situation to approach. I didn’t know how to address it and I didn’t know how to ask them to keep my privacy… private. It was a messy situation but it worked out in the end.
Alice: The only time I’ve been outed without my consent was to my extended family. I didn’t know that they knew until I was having a conversation with my uncle at a family party. He said, “Your mom told us” and he seemed kind of sad. It didn’t feel good to know that my aunts and uncles had known about me but hadn’t brought it up, like it was something embarrassing for me. Thankfully, I was at a point then where I was able to deal with it.  We had a long conversation about it and it ended up okay. It was kind of a good thing actually. 
Shane decides to blackmail Tommy into keeping Lauren’s secret. Have you ever done anything drastic to prevent people from finding out?
Maya: I was always very scared of anyone in my school finding out I had CAIS so I went to great lengths and tried to make sure no one would find out. I decided to fake a period for a really long time. I would go to the bathroom and complain with all my friends about cramps and ruined clothes. I finally decided to stop when friends started coming to me asking for pads or tampons. It was exhausting to be faking something so silly for so long.
Alice: There have been times where I’ve lied about having a period or being fertile but I have always felt awful after that. It’s very very strange and uncomfortable when people have specifically asked me about menstruating or about pregnancy because I don’t always want to dive into my life story. I have carried tampons and pretended to have a period but only when I was in middle school because it came up ALL THE TIME.
Lauren is really ashamed of her “secret.” How do you feel about this? Do you think being intersex is something that has to be kept secret?
Milly: No, not at all. There’s a difference between secrets and privacy. I think being private about being intersex is one thing, in the same way that I’m private about my dating and sex life. But viewing something as a secret makes it seem like it’s shameful, something that isn’t okay to talk about. And I don’t think that’s the case at all. We SHOULD be talking about these things.
Lenny: This is something I’ve definitely struggled with. I don’t think it should be a secret.  Secrets create a sense of shame and isolation. It is definitely something no one should feel shameful of, and I hope that no one ever has to feel like they are the only one. But it is something you have to be careful with. I live in a very conservative state. It can be scary at times to tell people because beliefs here are so entrenched and so black and white. I’ve been told to keep it to myself for my own safety and self care, and I agree to a certain extent. Unless you’re really comfortable with yourself, it can be terrifying and potentially harmful to be open in a less than supportive (and possibly hostile)  environment.  But I feel like  if  I can help anyone or show anyone that they aren’t alone by being open, then  I should do that.  I’ve tried to live by that belief, and my life has been way better for it.  But it’s not always so easy. 
Alice: Personally, I did feel for a long time that it was something personal and people didn’t have to know about it. Now, I am very open about it and I want people to see me as an intersex person. My hope is that as time and society progresses, all intersex people will live comfortably and proudly and will not feel like they should have to hide it. Although, I do respect everyone who does NOT identify as intersex and I totally believe that it is a completely personal choice to express yourself how you want to and not according to society.
Lexye: I enjoy sharing my condition and connecting in a meaningful way with people I feel comfortable around.  It might even come up naturally in a conversation.  Even though I speak of it often, I don’t necessarily feel like I have to tell everyone about it or talk about it all the time.  It isn’t the most important part about me (although it might be one of my favorite parts), and it doesn’t change who I am or was before I found out (my family, docs, and I found out altogether.)  Even though I’ve shared with large groups of people, most of my relatives don’t know, and I feel comfortable with that.  The most important thing is that I share when I’m ready and comfortable. I don’t think anyone “deserves” to know; it’s just one part of me.  And, it’s an important way I see the world.

interactyouth:

Did you catch tonight’s episode of Faking It?! Cat’s out of the bag! Lauren’s intersex! We’ll be talking to different Inter/Act members, a group of young 14-25 year old intersex people, asking them to relate their intersex stories with Lauren’s story each week.

Lauren’s ex-boyfriend lets it slip, and she has to tell everyone she’s intersex. How did it feel watching that happen?

Milly: It was really hard to watch, but also so incredible. The music, the timing, everything was done so well. I was watching it for the first time with the cast as they saw it for the first time. I couldn’t look over at them because I knew they were looking at me and I didn’t want them to see the tears in my eyes. It felt so real, like I was there instead of Lauren and it was all of my friends turning on me. It was something I’ve had nightmares about since I was little, so watching it play out on screen like that was really scary, but also empowering. I’ve never seen someone on TV going through this before, and it made it feel okay. Like if Lauren can handle it then certainly I can.

Alice: Sitting there watching the episode, I was laughing along just like I had when I binged on it at home recently. But when the scene where Lauren’s secret is revealed came on I stopped laughing and tensed up. After she said “I’m Intersex” I immediately felt like I was her, in that room and the characters around her were all looking at me with wide eyes. I became hyper-conscious of how quiet the room was and my breathing went from autopilot to manual. I felt like if I moved an inch, the eyes in the room would all turn and look at me so instead I just froze. Not blinking, I took in the characters reactions and waited for what was next. I could hear the nervousness in my laugh when they asked Lauren what Intersex meant. When she reacted my adrenaline kicked in and I could feel that fight or flight feeling as she ran from the room. When the scene ended I realized I had just been taken back to my 15 year old self.. scared, ashamed, as if “my secret” had been exposed to my peers without my consent. It’s really not every day that you see a character like me on TV, especially not like this. After a moment I felt happy, proud, excited, and just in awe of how meaningful this was to me. I’m so excited for people to meet and learn to understand a character who is Intersex. I’m really looking forward to the rest of the season and how it will all play out!

How did people find out about you? Did anyone find out accidentally like this?

Lenny: I’ve been really careful about telling people, asking each of them to keep it confidential. Like all secrets, it doesn’t always work out that way, but I’ve been lucky and never really had anyone “out” me to others before I was ready. At some point, I learned that you just have trust people.

Milly: I told my friend once, and a few years later we were hanging out with her new boyfriend. He made  a joke about punching me in the ovaries because apparently teenage boys think that’s a funny thing to say to a girl. My friend got all affronted and says “Don’t say that! I told you she doesn’t have ovaries, remember??” I felt so shocked and violated, I didn’t feel like I could trust her with anything after that.

Maya: I tried to make sure I was always in control when allowing people to find out about my CAIS. This was because I wanted to make sure they got the facts and not unreliable information. However my sister told some of our mutual friends without asking me and I found out later on that they knew, which was an incredibly tough situation to approach. I didn’t know how to address it and I didn’t know how to ask them to keep my privacy… private. It was a messy situation but it worked out in the end.

Alice: The only time I’ve been outed without my consent was to my extended family. I didn’t know that they knew until I was having a conversation with my uncle at a family party. He said, “Your mom told us” and he seemed kind of sad. It didn’t feel good to know that my aunts and uncles had known about me but hadn’t brought it up, like it was something embarrassing for me. Thankfully, I was at a point then where I was able to deal with it.  We had a long conversation about it and it ended up okay. It was kind of a good thing actually.

Shane decides to blackmail Tommy into keeping Lauren’s secret. Have you ever done anything drastic to prevent people from finding out?

Maya: I was always very scared of anyone in my school finding out I had CAIS so I went to great lengths and tried to make sure no one would find out. I decided to fake a period for a really long time. I would go to the bathroom and complain with all my friends about cramps and ruined clothes. I finally decided to stop when friends started coming to me asking for pads or tampons. It was exhausting to be faking something so silly for so long.

Alice: There have been times where I’ve lied about having a period or being fertile but I have always felt awful after that. It’s very very strange and uncomfortable when people have specifically asked me about menstruating or about pregnancy because I don’t always want to dive into my life story. I have carried tampons and pretended to have a period but only when I was in middle school because it came up ALL THE TIME.

Lauren is really ashamed of her “secret.” How do you feel about this? Do you think being intersex is something that has to be kept secret?

Milly: No, not at all. There’s a difference between secrets and privacy. I think being private about being intersex is one thing, in the same way that I’m private about my dating and sex life. But viewing something as a secret makes it seem like it’s shameful, something that isn’t okay to talk about. And I don’t think that’s the case at all. We SHOULD be talking about these things.

Lenny: This is something I’ve definitely struggled with. I don’t think it should be a secret.  Secrets create a sense of shame and isolation. It is definitely something no one should feel shameful of, and I hope that no one ever has to feel like they are the only one. But it is something you have to be careful with. I live in a very conservative state. It can be scary at times to tell people because beliefs here are so entrenched and so black and white. I’ve been told to keep it to myself for my own safety and self care, and I agree to a certain extent. Unless you’re really comfortable with yourself, it can be terrifying and potentially harmful to be open in a less than supportive (and possibly hostile)  environment.  But I feel like  if  I can help anyone or show anyone that they aren’t alone by being open, then  I should do that.  I’ve tried to live by that belief, and my life has been way better for it.  But it’s not always so easy.

Alice: Personally, I did feel for a long time that it was something personal and people didn’t have to know about it. Now, I am very open about it and I want people to see me as an intersex person. My hope is that as time and society progresses, all intersex people will live comfortably and proudly and will not feel like they should have to hide it. Although, I do respect everyone who does NOT identify as intersex and I totally believe that it is a completely personal choice to express yourself how you want to and not according to society.

Lexye: I enjoy sharing my condition and connecting in a meaningful way with people I feel comfortable around.  It might even come up naturally in a conversation.  Even though I speak of it often, I don’t necessarily feel like I have to tell everyone about it or talk about it all the time.  It isn’t the most important part about me (although it might be one of my favorite parts), and it doesn’t change who I am or was before I found out (my family, docs, and I found out altogether.)  Even though I’ve shared with large groups of people, most of my relatives don’t know, and I feel comfortable with that.  The most important thing is that I share when I’m ready and comfortable. I don’t think anyone “deserves” to know; it’s just one part of me.  And, it’s an important way I see the world.

(via leafycat)


walkingsaladshooterfromheaven:

People say “professional”

when what they really mean is “not having visual/behavioral markers of being poor, disabled, or culturally ‘other’”

which effectively shuts out of professional careers the very people who are most likely to be in dire need of income

I see your bullshit

(via leafycat)


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